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Project

 
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ARSF - Flight 03/06: River Corridors

Status: completed
Publication State: published

Abstract

ARSF project 03/06. Site: River Corridors. PI: Dr D Mason, University of Reading

Data in support of the project Brassica as a model to describe the pattern and consequences of transgene movement into the environment. The project was using remotely sensed data to develop a gene flow likelihood map quantifying the incidence of gene flow from oilseed rape to its wild relatives over the whole of the? While it will still be necessary to acquire many satellite images for detecting fields of oilseed rape, it had now become clear that one of the main errors in the gene flow likelihood map stemed from uncertainty in predicting the incidence of the wild parents of oilseed rape. This proposal was to map the wild relatives at selected sites to reduce this uncertainty and to test a number of hypotheses that had been generated in the early stages of the project..

Gene flow is defined as the movement of genes between populations and is a naturally occurring phenomenon among sexually compatible individuals. Crops have exchanged genes with their wild and weedy relatives for centuries, however this process has recently caused concern. The rapid advances in genetic engineering have hit an immense wall of opposition and gene flow is now seen as a possible escape route for transgenes. The safety of genetically modified (GM) crops has been fervently debated and the possible risks, to both the consumers of the crops and to the environment, have prevented their commercialisation in the? and many other countries. Concern had arisen that if detrimental effects were to be detected post release of any GM crop, withdrawal would be difficult, or impossible, if gene flow has already occurred.

Abbreviation: ARSF_03_06
Keywords: Not defined

Related parties
Principal Investigators (1)