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Dataset Collection

 
Quantifying and Understanding the Earth System (QUEST) Logo

QUEST Quaternary: Marine isotope and glacial cycle model data (150,000 years ago to present)

Status: Not defined
Publication State: published

Abstract

Quaternary QUEST was led by Dr Tim Lenton at UEA, with a team of 10 co-investigators at the Universities of Cambridge, Oxford, Reading, Leeds, Bristol, Southampton and at UEA.

This dataset collection contains glacial and isotope model data.

Over the last million years, the Earth has experienced a sequence of temperature oscillations between glacial and interglacial states, linked to variations in the Earth’s orbit around the sun. These climate oscillations were accompanied by changes in atmospheric CO2, but the fundamental reasons for this relationship are still unresolved.

This project team aimed to compile a synthesis of palaeodata from sediments and ice cores, improve the synchronization of these records with each other, and use this greater understanding of the Earth’s ancient atmosphere to improve Earth system models simulating climate over very long timescales. A combined long-term data synthesis and modelling approach has helped to constrain some key mechanisms responsible for glacial-interglacial CO2 change, and Quaternary QUEST narrowed the field of ocean processes that could have caused glacial CO2 drawdown.

Citable as:Natural Environment Research Council; Crowhurst, S.; Hoogakker, B.; Lenton, T.; Oliver, K.; et. al (2008): QUEST Quaternary: Marine isotope and glacial cycle model data (150,000 years ago to present). NCAS British Atmospheric Data Centre, date of citation. http://catalogue.ceda.ac.uk/uuid/33a39f647824bbd542c4ce9b88c9e9fd
Abbreviation: quaternary_quest
Keywords: QUEST, Quaternary, carbon dioxide, climate change, glaciation

Coverage
Temporal Range
Start time:
0001-01-01T00:00:00
End time:
2008-11-30T23:59:59
Geographic Extent

 
90.0000°
 
-180.0000°
 
180.0000°
 
-90.0000°